Andy Reid: By The Numbers

In her Friday ESPN Column, Ashley Fox posits that “Reid will survive Eagles’ nightmare.” She presents a good case, and tops it off with this nugget:

Reid is also under contract through 2013. Buying him out would not be cheap.

So take a deep breath, and be prepared for a Reid Redux in 2012. That said, I’m worried. I’m worried because if you’re not getting better in the NFL, you’re getting worse. I broke down Donovan McNabb’s numbers here back in April 2010 when McNabb was traded. So let’s dissect the Reid era.

Andy Reid, Wins By Year

1999-2004: On the Way Up

Obviously 1999 was the beginning of the rebuilding. Interestingly, Reid’s first year, 5-win total actually improved upon 1998’s 3 win campaign, the last under Ray Rhodes. Throw out all the other stats: wins matter. And win he did, steadily rising up to 2004’s 13 win total (which, had they had anything to play for the last few weeks of the season, would have undoubtedly be greater). Note the consistency.

1999-2004: Summary

4 consecutive division titles, 5 consecutive trips to the playoffs, 7 playoff wins, 4 consecutive NFC Championship Games, and a Super Bowl appearance.

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 GP W L Pct.
5-11 11-5 11-5 12-4 12-4 13-2 96 64 31 .667

2005-2011: On the Way Down

To quote the Wikipedia entry on the matter, “The 2005 Philadelphia Eagles season was a complete disaster for the team.” Between the Terrell Owens show and the injuries – and the post-Super Bowl hangover – it got ugly. Since 2004’s 13 wins, the Eagles have failed to win more than 11 games – and they’ve done that only once.

2005-2011: Summary

In the 7 seasons from 2005-2011, Reid’s earned 2 division titles, 4 playoff appearances, 3 playoff wins, and 1 NFC Championship appearance. Granted 2011 isn’t over yet, but I’m willing to bet that they aren’t getting to the playoffs this year.

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 GP W L Pct.
6-10 10-6 8-8 9-6-1 11-5 10-6 3-6 105 57 47 .543

End of an Era?

Not only has Reid been on a downward spiral since 2005, but he has also been maddeningly inconsistent. And not only from season to season, but within seasons. Consider 2006; the Eagles were 5-6 before miraculously running off 5 consecutive wins to seize the division.

In 2009 they seemed to catch lightning in a bottle, but still came up short.  Mike Vick’s 2010 season clouded the reality of a team in disarray. The team we saw at the conclusion of the 2010 season was in fact the Real Eagles – the Eagles we see before us now. A bad team.

His teams since 2005 have shown Zero signs of the steady, consistent improvement that marked the first half of his tenure here.

The Reid era ended in January 2005.  The numbers bear it out.

NFL Week 15 (Already?!) Thursday Night Edition

The End Is Near

Already at Week 15, and still only 9 teams have been eliminated. Hard to believe that San Francisco, St. Louis and Seattle are not among those eliminated.

Poor Officiating and Michael Vick

I was stunned Sunday night during the Eagles-Cowboys tilt, when penalty after penalty went uncalled. Of course, I was biased in the Eagles direction. In particular, there was a missed facemask on Trent Cole, and, perhaps more egregiously, Anthony Spencer’s unnecessarily rough treatment of Michael Vick as Vick was going out of bounds.

I’ve watched football for a long, long time, and yes, that call can occasionally be missed. But only rarely. I don’t see running backs, or wideouts, or even kick returners getting roughed up like that. And if they do get roughed up like that, there’s a flag.

And there should have been a flag Sunday night. Vick was clearly letting up and clearly headed out of bounds. Is something more afoot here?

We'll Just Plop Our Hockey Rinks Right HERE

I find it difficult to blame the players. They will take anything they can get. Just ask James Harrison. But I am curious about the non-action of the referees. And I found someone else questioning this issue, too: Gregg Easterbrook, in this week’s Tuesday Morning Quarterback column (published at, of all places, ESPN, the Cartoon Network of Sport). Easterbrook writes:

Are officials, as Andy Reid contends, allowing hits on Vick that they would flag if against Tom Brady or Peyton Manning — or for that matter against other quarterbacks who run, such as Aaron Rodgers (55 rushing attempts) or Ryan Fitzpatrick (36 rushing attempts)? That zebras are letting Vick take illegal hits seems indisputable. It’s not just that officials regard Vick as a runner even when he’s in a passing stance — penalties should be called if defenders hit the knees or helmets of players in a passing stance. TMQ thinks there is a psychological factor, too. Vick is an African-American who has been to prison. Society devalues people of that description, and allows them to be treated in ways that others are not. This is subtly different from racism, but a factor nonetheless. Ex-convicts who show no remorse are one thing; Vick paid his debt and by appearances at least is a changed man. Yet officials seem to view him as someone who’s OK to try to harm. The NFL and its officials need to have a look in the mirror about this.

113,411 people turned out to watch the Michigan – Michigan State Hockey game. NFL (not to mention its Criminal Co-Conspirators, NCAA Division 1 and the BCS) Football is not the only game in town.


  • SAN DIEGO -10 over San Francisco. I have no clue about this game. Is anyone hurt? I can’t imagine San Francisco pulling out this road game, and quite frankly, don’t want to.

On Michael Vick, from columnists and more

Phil Hoffmann writes on 

WHAT DO YOU say we make a deal? If Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick is convicted or pleads guilty to the charges contained in a federal indictment – charges of sponsoring a dogfighting operation so heinous that losing dogs who didn’t die in the ring were sometimes shot, drowned, hanged or electrocuted – then his National Football League career should be over.Until that time, though, why don’t we let the prosecutor do his work?

I disagree, and said so in an e-mail I sent to Mr. Hoffman, copied here:I have a difficult time worrying about “justice” for something as trivial as whether a man can play a football game. Granted passions run deep – perhaps not as deep as the NFL’s pockets – but still: it’s just a game.

I have an especially difficult time worrying about denying him an opportunity to make a living, as thousands of people sit and sit in jail, unable to make bail, for (alleged) offenses far less egregious than this.  I would gladly credit him for time served, should he be proved guilty and sentenced to prison.

But I sure as hell don’t want to see him play in an NFL game until this matter is settled. I can’t imagine any sponsor standing for it. I can’t imagine the Falcons letting that happen. They have to let Vick go. Too bad they traded away their best quarterback.

There used to be a time when, if you found yourself entangled in some embarrassing imbroglio, you’d lay low for a while. Nowadays, you make a video with your cell phone, post it on YouTube, and you become Paris Hilton.



Bill Conlin argues in a related column that Vick will need protection from Vigilante Justice. Interesting point; not sure I would use that as Argument One for shuttling Vick of the Public Eye for a while.  

Bob Ford calls the case “Grisly and Shocking.” He quotes the indictment itself:

[W]hen you get to Page 17, you find Charge No. 83: “In or about April 2007, PEACE, PHILLIPS, and VICK executed approximately 8 dogs that did not perform well in ‘testing’ sessions at 1915 Moonlight Road by various methods, including hanging, drowning, and slamming at least one dog’s body to the ground.”

What a public relations nightmare for the NFL. 

I’m glad I have the Eagles and Donovan McNabb. The worst thing you can say about our quarterback situation is that 5 is coming off surgery, and his heir apparent is a rookie.

Here’s the report from CBS:

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Source: Rich Hofmann | Don’t dog him unless he’s found guilty | Daily News | 07/18/2007